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10 Titles Match Your Query
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1. A study of global (Very Low Frequency) VLF propagation with emphasis on the effects of stratospheric ionisation and glacial ice in Antarctica [K138_1992_1993_NZ_1]
The performance of GPS navigation equipment for possible future deployment on Antarctic resupply flights was investigated. In addition, using Hercules C-130 aircrafts fitted with GPS, VLF propagation ...


2. Atmospheric air samples from aboard supply aircrafts operating between Christchurch, New Zealand and McMurdo Sound investigating the atmospheric chemistry and reactions between carbon monoxide, methane and ozone [K087_1996_1998_NZ_1]
Large whole air samples collected from a compressor system aboard the supply aircrafts operating between Christchurch and McMurdo incorporated measurements of ozone. In association with concentration ...


3. Measurements of carbon dioxide concentrations from the atmosphere via equipment aboard supply aircrafts operating between Christchurch, New Zealand and McMurdo Sound [K087_1996_2008_NZ_2]
Carbon dioxide (CO2) in the earth's atmosphere is considered a trace gas and also a greenhouse gas. Levels of CO2 in the atmosphere are increasing due to anthropogenic activity. An automated flask ...


4. Measurements of carbon monoxide concentrations and isotopic ratios from the atmosphere via equipment aboard supply aircrafts operating between Christchurch, New Zealand and McMurdo Sound [K087_1991_2008_NZ_2]
Carbon monoxide (CO) is a trace gas in the atmosphere. The use of the radioactive isotope 14C in carbon monoxide is useful for determining the oxidative capacity via oxidation by hydroxyl (OH). Large ...


5. Measurements of methane concentrations and isotopic ratios from the atmosphere via equipment aboard supply aircrafts operating between Christchurch, New Zealand and McMurdo Sound [K087_1989_2008_NZ_2]
The atmospheric trace gas, methane (CH4), affects the radiative heat balance of the earth. Measurements of the carbon and hydrogen isotopes in atmospheric methane are used to relate this climatically ...


6. Annual measurements of atmospheric nitrous oxide concentrations from Arrival Heights, Ross Island since May 1996 [K087_1996_2008_NZ_3]
Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the main naturally occurring regulator of stratospheric ozone and is therefore a major greenhouse gas. Small whole dry air samples (2L) are collected annually (between 12 to ...


7. Measurements of nitrous oxide concentrations from the atmosphere via equipment aboard supply aircrafts operating between Christchurch, New Zealand and McMurdo Sound [K087_1996_2008_NZ_4]
Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the main naturally occurring regulator of stratospheric ozone and is therefore a major greenhouse gas. An automated flask sampling system is used to collect small atmospheric ...


8. Analysis of isotopic ratios of water vapour samples from the stratosphere to determine polar stratospheric cloud formation and disintigration [K087_2001_2006_NZ_1]
The transport of water vapor near the tropopause and lower stratosphere, e.g. The inflow of tropospheric water vapor into the stratosphere and the vertical redistribution of stratospheric water vapor ...


9. Measurements of carbon dioxide concentrations and isotopic ratios from air samples collected at the surface and at altitude between New Zealand and the South Pole to determine if the Southern Ocean is a carbon sink [K087_1998_2004_NZ_1]
Carbon dioxide concentrations between New Zealand and the South Pole were found to vary for periods of several years suggesting that the Southern Ocean is acting as a sink. The role of the Southern ...


10. Direct measurements of cosmic rays (neutron) flux at several sites in Antarctica [K112_1997_2000_NZ_2]
Cosmic rays (neutron) flux was directly measured with a portable detector in conjunction with a study examining the production of cosmic ray produced nuclides in rocks. The semi portable detector ...


Showing 1 through 10 of 10

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