Differences in Prevalence of Obesity Among Black, White, and Hispanic Adults --- United States, 2006-2008
Entry ID: OBE-BWH06-08

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Summary
Abstract: During 2006−2008, the age-adjusted estimated prevalence of obesity overall was 25.6% among non-Hispanic blacks, non-Hispanic whites, and Hispanics. Non-Hispanic blacks had the greatest prevalence of obesity (35.7%), followed by Hispanics (28.7%), and non-Hispanic whites (23.7%) (Table 1). These differences were consistent across all census regions and greater among women than men. Non-Hispanic black women had the greatest prevalence (39.2%), followed by non-Hispanic black men (31.6%), Hispanic women (29.4%), Hispanic men (27.8%), non-Hispanic white men (25.4%), and non-Hispanic white women (21.8%)

Purpose: Obesity is associated with increased health-care costs, reduced quality of life, and increased risk for premature death (1,2). Common morbidities associated with obesity include coronary heart disease, hypertension and stroke, type 2 diabetes, and certain types of cancer (1,2). As of 2007, no state had met the Healthy People 2010 objective to reduce to 15% the prevalence of obesity among U.S. ... View entire text
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Data Set Citation
Dataset Originator/Creator: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Dataset Title: Differences in Prevalence of Obesity Among Black, White, and Hispanic Adults --- United States, 2006--2008
Dataset Release Date: July 17, 2009
Dataset Publisher: Mortality and Morbidity Weekly Report
Version: Vol. 58
Online Resource: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5827a2.htm
ISO Topic Category
Quality The findings in this report are subject to at least three limitations. First, the respondent heights and weights used to calculate BMI were self-reported. The prevalences of obesity reported in this study likely are underestimated because height commonly is overreported and weight underreported (10). Second, BRFSS excludes persons without landline telephones. Evidence shows that adults living in wireless-only households tend to be younger, to have lower incomes, and to be members of minority populations,†† which might result in either underestimates or overestimates. Third, because of limited numbers of non-Hispanic black respondents in five states, valid estimates for that population could not be calculated for those states.
Data Center
Chronic Disease Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Supplemental Info
Data Center URL: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/

Data Center Personnel
Name: CDC MORBIDITY AND MORALITY WEEKLY REPORT (MMWR)
Phone: (404) 498-1150
Fax: (404) 498-2389
Email: mmwrq at cdc.gov
Contact Address:
1600 Clifton Rd., MS E-90
City: Atlanta
Province or State: Georgia
Postal Code: 30333
Country: United States
Personnel
Role: TECHNICAL CONTACT
Phone: (404) 498-1150
Fax: (404) 498-2389
Email: mmwrq at cdc.gov
Contact Address:
1600 Clifton Rd., MS E-90
City: Atlanta
Province or State: Georgia
Postal Code: 30333
Country: United States
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Publications/References
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Clinical guideline on the identification, evaluation, and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: the evidence report. Bethesda, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; 1998. Available at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/obesity/ob_gdlns.htm.
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Creation and Review Dates
DIF Creation Date: 2011-06-29
Last DIF Revision Date: 2011-08-26
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