Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research Project

Project Description
The purpose of the Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) Project was to estimate major fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and water in forest ecosystems using an ecosystem-process model driven by remotely sensed data. The project was conducted from 1990 to 1991. The DAAC's data holdings include background data from 1989.

The goals of OTTER were

1. to simulate and predict ecosystem processes, such as photosynthesis, transpiration, aboveground production, nitrogen transformation, respiration, decomposition, and hydrologic processes;

2. to combine field, laboratory, and remote-sensing techniques to estimate key vegetation and environmental parameters;

3. to construct a geo-referenced database for extrapolating and testing principles, techniques, and prediction; and

4. to verify the predictions through direct measurements of process rates or controls on processes.

OTTER's main objective was to estimate major fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and water in forest ecosystems through the use of an ecosystem-process model driven by remotely sensed data. Other objectives included the following: to simulate a forest ecosystem and predict a variety of parameters through the use of a computer model; to characterize the spectral variability in conifer foliage between age classes, species, and sites; and to characterize the stand mean and variability in the Leaf Area Index.

http://daac.ornl.gov/OTTER/otter.shtml

[Summary provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory.]